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Human Touch: The Role Companionship Plays in Aging at Home (Canada)

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The latest advances in universal design and technology have made it easier than ever to age in place. One important human need, though, can only be met by companionship. According to recent Statistics Canada data, as many as 1.4 million elderly Canadians report feeling lonely.

Two-thirds (67 percent) of North American homeowners between ages 55 and 75 surveyed by Home Instead, Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care® network, believe that loneliness or isolation impacts their decision in some way on where to live while aging.

"Technology is great to keep older adults connected to family or to current events, but you can't replace another human sitting down and conversing or sharing a meal," noted Home Instead Senior Care Gerontologist and Caregiver Advocate Lakelyn Hogan. "Socialization is one of the key factors of successful aging," she said.

"Human interaction goes a long way toward decreasing loneliness and isolation, and reducing the risk of cognitive impairment," Hogan noted. "That human and physical touch – a hug or hand-holding – is important and meaningful. Older adults still find meaning in human engagement. You don't realize how much impact a visit has on older adults. It could be the highlight of their year."

"Isolation can lead to significant health problems for seniors, so having the ability to connect to other people is an important component to staying healthy", Margaret Gillis, President of the International Longevity Centre Canada stated. "Also make sure that your senior loved one has the right to get out there and fully and effectively participate at all levels; this includes access to public, political, cultural, and economic decisions at both the community and political level."

Companionship and human contact is an important part of healthy aging, particularly where nutrition is concerned, Hogan noted. "We had a client who wasn't eating when Home Instead started working with her. She wasn't cooking anymore and was in the early stages of dementia. The family brought Home Instead in to help with nutritional needs," Hogan said.

"When the Home Instead CAREGiver℠ started working with the client, she still wasn't eating. Then the CAREGiver got to know the family and found out the woman had loved to eat out. So the CAREGiver made dinner at home an event complete with special touches such as a table cloth. She dusted off the fine china and added candles, and really celebrated mealtime with music and companionship. Anyone can drop off a meal, but engaging seniors while they eat, sitting down with a cup of tea or helping out in the garden make such a difference."

Companionship also can provide an important safeguard for older adults at home, Hogan said. "Having a second set of eyes and ears could help point out red flags to family members. Professional Home Instead CAREGivers, for instance, are trained to watch for home safety hazards. If older adults have a safe environment, they can age in place for a longer period of time. Someone regularly in the home will be the first to notice if an older adult is having an off day, and provide peace of mind for that family member."

For more information, contact your local Home Instead Senior Care office www.HomeInstead.com.

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Last revised: February 26, 2019

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